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20130113
20130121
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Search Results 0 to 33 of about 34 (some duplicates have been removed)
of our schools. they're not military encampments. they're safe environments in which the children feel very secure around with that kind of protection. you think about, in your country, england has an armed presence for international flights going in and out of england in a very sensitive environment called an airplane. post-9/11, people said guns have no place in the cockpit or in the passenger planes. but in fact, they have worked very well because they're trained. >> actually, let me pick you up on that. what's been effective on planes is an outright ban on any weapons, any guns. that's what's been effective. the reason you dont see people using guns on planes is they have been banned. this brings me to the point of what i have been trying to get to on this show, which is it's not about removing everybody's guns in america. it's a complete fallacy when people spin out that line. it's designed, i think, to instill the kind of fear president obama talked about today. trying to make people think, oh, my god, they're coming for my gun. and what happens is a lot of americans buy more of
of discussion feels dead on arrival in this political environment where we can't get something like a basic budget done. >> the problem is we're going to have to do some of this, anyway. anyone who owns a home knows this. if you defer maintenance, if you say to yourself, my boiler is leaking but i'm not going to fix it, that's actually a penny wise, pound-foolish decision. it will eventually break and cost you three times as much. that's what's happening with our roads, bridges and highways. if you look at air travel. we have one of the world's most antiquated travel systems, we need to update the antiquated computer system. one day you're going to have terrible problems or you're going to have a kind of the system will break down, it's not going to cost $25 billion. it will cost $50 billion. >> there's another thing we don't talk about enough. we're talking about spending as if there's this generally irresponsible spending around. some of that might be true. the bigger issue is nilements, the growth in what those are going to cost us over time. that's the real threat. it's the one that is
there in helping the schools provide a more secure environment and in terms of what's been provided to congress on the gun control side, all i can say, that's not going to help keep our children safer and i want to look for solutions in the schools to have better technology, have the better architecture, have the armed trained presence there, to really protect the children and keep our parents having confidence in our schools. >> sean: they keep saying gun-free school zones. is that the answer? >> well, that's actually -- no, it's not the answer in terms -- of course, you could have an armed trained law enforcement person there, even in a gun-free zone. so, that does not necessarily be inconsistent. but in some parts of the country there's not enough resources for a sworn officer there, so the question is, are we going to have other trained school officials there that are trained, properly trained, but can have a response capability to an armed intruder? right now, that would violate many of the state laws on gun-free zones. and so, you're going to have to look at legal changes to accomplish th
environment, too. i work for people in a different environment than what we see going on in some of these places where mass shootings are going, to the best of my knowledge. i live in a great county. we have a great population of people. and that's not to say that something like that couldn't happen in walton county. it very easily could. but we haven't reached the point of where we have gangs and that sort of thing. >> do you think more restrictions -- more gun restrictions will reduce crimes? >> i don't think it's going to make a difference at all. >> thank you, sheriff. >> we already have some laws now that i've tried to enforce that the federal authorities -- people would lie on an atf firearms form and it was no big deal. and i didn't understand it. >> thank you, sheriff. thanks for coming in. we appreciate you coming in. we'd like to have you back. >> thank you. >>> shortly after the newtown shootings, a gun shop owner came on this show to be a part of my panel and he has seen -- i want to know if he's seen any changes since then. what are his customers saying? we're going
in tune politically whether it's for the environment or for good health, whatever, is that part of conscious capitalism you make a decision not to just go for the dollar? >> actually, conscious capitalism rejects the premise behind that question. >> greta: okay. >> the premise is there's trade-offs and you have to negotiate between the trade-offs, if you're doing something for the environment it must come at the expense of the investors. good conscious leadership is to define win, win, win strategies so all of these stake holders simultaneously winning, that's sometimes not easy requires imagination and creativity. >> greta: taxes and have you thought about our corporate tax rate? >> could have,we have the highest corporate tax rate in the entire world now. japan used to be number one and u.s. number two. they cut their rates and now when you combine state and federal taxes, the highest corporate tax rates in the world. >> greta: how does that affect your business? you're very successful, you're a rich man and how does it affect you and your employees. >> every dollar we pay in
are at risk in this environment to things like this because you just don't know who you're dealing with. >> that was notre dame's athletic director on wednesday night, speaking about the revelation that a large part of the inspiring story behind their heisman trophy finalist, manti te'o, was to good to be true. in fact, the girlfriend that had died, was not true. questions about how somebody had played a cruel trick, for 30 minutes he talked about how te'o was a victim, and firmly believed he had nothing to to do with the hoax. in 2010, elizabeth seburg, at the college across the street from notre dame told the campus police she was sexually assaulted by a notre dame football player. over the next ten days, a friend of the football player sent her multiple text messages, including this one, don't do anything you would regret. messing with notre dame football is a bad idea. lizzie committed suicide on day ten, the campus police didn't get around to questioning the football player until five days after her death. he was found not responsible, and was never taken off the field. my colleagu
. >> reporter: still, some conservative christians say the focus shouldn't be on guns, but on the environment giving rise to this violence. >> instead of having as the nra proposes a policeman in every school. getting a dad in every home. >> reporter: vice president biden said he's glad that evangelical groups participated in his meetings because in the past, they have been reluctant to engage on the gun issue." athena jones, cnn, washington. >>> time for a little introduction. i want you to take a look here. this is my cat, browser. he's at home right now watching the show, no doubt. but he's pretty cute and cuddly. i spoil him rotten, but could he be plotting something sinister? could he be plotting to kill me? doesn't look like it there. we'll talk about it next with the author of "how to tell if your cat is trying to kill you." about health care... s i tuned it all out. with unitedhealthcare, i get information that matters... my individual health profile. not random statistics. they even reward me for addressing my health risks. so i'm doing fine... but she's still going to give me a
justice, looking at our environment. president obama represents hope, trust, stability and compassion. he's the right person for this time. it's no accident that the inaugural ceremony is tomorrow on martin luther king day. i just wonder if when martin luther king jr. said "i have a dream," did he have this vision? >> interesting. you said lincoln was the right man for the time. in your article, i don't have it in front of me, i think i'm paraphrasing it, you said lincoln was reviled and he was loved at the same time. i think many people would feel the same way about president obama now. >> yes. >> do you think people knew that about lincoln and do you think it's the same about president obama now? >> you know, whenever there's a move toward something that's new, that's not part of the old paradigm, there are reactionary forces. and those reactionary forces can revile the leader who wants to take us into the new longing the people are expressing. so, yes, we have a partisan country now where we have these forces, progressive forces on the one side and extreme, ultra, ideological, reaction
of statistics and the economic environment that we're in today? >> now, i wish i had an answer to that one. you know, i've said before that there is a highway into poverty today, and there's not even a sidewalk out. and there's very little, once you get there, and you are so there, that can be done to help you at this point in time. because there aren't the jobs, there aren't the resources, there aren't the credit limits that there used to be. so the real key here is, what can you do out there right now to prevent yourself from going into poverty? and i always say that there are three things. three things that if we could just learn to ask ourselves, before we spend a penny. number one, is it a need or a want? obviously, if it's a need, you have to buy it. if it's a want, can you just walk away? you have to get as much pleasure in saving as you do spending. this era of spending, spending, spending has got to go. and last but not least, we all have to get as much pleasu in saving as we do spending. so, you know, it's very interesting. >> suze, what if you're one of those people who's unemployed.
attacks, the united states is susceptible to that environment. it's not only here in the united states but u.s. interests around the world. and that's why the u.s. has to maintain or believes it has to maintain that presence there. there's no doubt that going forward many of these issues are going to come to the surface. afghanistan could find itself in a very bloody civil war. iraq after the u.s. withdrawal has not gotten necessarily better. there's still violence. there are still attacks. but to some extent u.s. interests are a little more secured as a result of what happened there in the eyes of, you know, the united states officials that pursued that war. so again, you could make the argument that in afghanistan something similar could happen. but there's no doubt a great deal of uncertainty, great deal of questions remain. as to whether or not the central government in afghanistan can actually control the military and preserve the security, integrity of that country. and that remains to be seen. >> if only we could predict the future. all right, ayman, good to see you. >> thanks a
to accomplish those things in the current political environment. with the kind of enormous pushback he has gotten from both republicans in congress and from very intransigen right wing. people look at that and say let's put this into some context. you go back to that day in january in 2009 when the president was sworn in and you recognize we lost 750,000 jobs that month and every single month and where this economy has come and i think this go around folks are pragmatic but looking at that and saying, well now might be the time and the opportunity for the president to act in a different way. >> it seems like that persists. one of the things about the obama era is i think when we embarked upon it there seemed to be sort of two ways of reading the last four years. one was electing a black president and the normalcy that would bring that melissa was just talking about would be a net positive for race relations in america and the struggle for equality and the other aspect is the way electing a black president produced back lash and sometimes very highly racialized back lash. i wonder which of
't be on guns but the environment giving rise to this violence. >> instead of having, as the nra proposes, a policeman in every school, our policy should be focused on getting a dad in every home. >> reporter: vice president biden said friday he is glad evangelical groups have participated in his gun policy task force meetings because in the past, they have been "reluctant to engage in the gun issue." athena jones, cnn, washington. >> you can see more about this story on our belief log at cnn.com/belief. >>> a maintenance shed in new york city's central park turned up a shocking discovery, a loaded cannon from an old british warship dating you to the revolutionary war. it's been sitting around for centuries. workers were cleaning the rust when they found the cannon still had gunpowder and a cannon ball. a spark or a flame could have set it off. >> this is an amazing surprise. it was there for so many years and people were sitting on it when it was a loaded cannon. >> technicians removed about two pounds of black powder and they have div posed of it at a gun range. what an amazing story. >
christians say the focus shouldn't be on gunnings but on the environment giving rise to this violence. >> instead of having as the nra proposes a policeman in every school, our policy should be focusing on getting a dad in every home. >> reporter: vice president biden said friday he's glad i n evangelical groups have participated in his gun policy task force meetings because in the past they have been, quote, reluctant to engage on the gun issue. athena jones, cnn, washington. >>> the president is promising action when it comes to curbing gun violence. the vice president even expected to endorse efforts to reinstate that assault weapons ban, but the opposition says that just isn't going to happen. t spot, not easy to find, but worth it. but with copd making it hard to breathe, i thought those days might be over. so my doctor prescribed symbicort. it helps significantly improve my lung function starting within five minutes. symbicort doesn't replace a rescue inhaler for sudden symptoms. with symbicort, today i'm breathing better. and that means...fish on! symbicort is for copd includi
for them. he is not responsible for them having a proper environment in which to do their jobs and that will include making sure that don't ask, don't tell and elimination of don't ask, don't tell is fully implemented. >> with regard to the military budget, he has called the military a bloated organization. chairman of the joint chiefs, martin dempsey, said this week that we are on the brink of creating a hollow force. would a secretary of defense hagel preside over the hollowing out of the defense department? >> the biggest concern with respect to who will league out is this sequester that's hanging like a sword over the department. that's what they had tried -- have to not let that happen but with respect to going in and finding things within the department of defense that perhaps you don't need or you can eliminate, if that's what you mean by bloat, i hope he does find bloat and gets rid of it. >> do you agree with his characterization that it's bloated? >> bloated doesn't necessarily mean the whole department is bloated. bloated mean there is are probably things in the depa
. i think it's fermented a -- you know, an environment that's become increasingly uncivil. >> all right. we have exhausted this subject. i want to move on quickly and i don't have a lot of time. i want to talk about you said the president seemed antagonistic and other people say the president is more confident now and has really come into his own in the second term. she said antagonistic. do you see antagonistic or more confident now? >> i think there's some big things the country has to do for gun reform, for example. big things that the president -- he has to do. he has to be strong and show leadership to get these things done. you know, republicans are ready to come out and say they don't want to have anything to do with it. so as a leader, he's got to sort of pull together the country, go to the people, organize and get this thing done. he can't wait for congress to -- wait for congress to do it. he's got to try to get as much done as he possibly can. >> i think he's both things, more confident and maybe more antagonistic. maybe more antagonistic because he is more confident.
was talking about green jobs. we thought maybe the environment was going to maybe not make the list at all. >> i go back what the president said in his first inaugural address he talked about the time of putting off unpleasant decision that time has surely passed. the most unpleasant decision is the country is going broke and we need to save our children and we need to save the next generation it is becoming, the demographic changes of america is what is driving it even more than spending decisions are and the task of whoever is president in this era to deal with the underlying demographic issues we face and entitlements. we don't do that we will continue to have a low-growth economy with high unemployment. got to get our fiscal house in order. to me that is the biggest of all. >> havens, do you think, given the president any genuine sign they are willing to work with him? >> well, the decision to postpone a fight over the debt limit, that, of itself, was. they saved themselves from themselves, which i believe. but also a recognition the president has the upper hand on some things, can't f
, are they being exploited, are they in a safe environment, if they are children, are they underage, it's everywhere. it's not just prostitution that children are being put into. it's work environments. it's hard, grueling labor. and they're children. i mean -- >> taking advantage of many of these kids, right? all kinds of ways. >> absolutely. >> what is it in your personal background that drew to this issue? i always find it's something that drew you to this particular issue. >> it is. i just think that, you know, children they need someone to fight for them, they can't defend themselves, so they need an advocate, and, you know, they are our future. they are who we have to believe in and support, and i think any healthy adult, you know, is -- is a healthy child, someone who knew they were loved, knew they were believed in, knew they were cared for, protected and all of those wonderful things that none of these children have. i mean, look at them. they're horrifically abused from the beginning. >> a kid in haiti was telling me the story of how he was bought for ten dollars u.s. and i re
to keep control. he had to control the environment. he had to control the situation. and that, again, is so similar to madoff. >> sports is filled with cheating and everybody knows it, but there is an aspect of this story that oprah asked lance armstrong which is about in order to cover up, he told a lot of lies. that included emma o'reilly, armstrong's former masseuse. she said lance, quote, tried to make her life a living hell after she went public with some of the details of his doping operation. >> what do you want to say about emma o'reilly? >> hey, she -- she's one of these people that i have to apologize to. >> mm-hmm. >> she's one of these people that got run over, got bullied. >> yeah. isn't she -- you sued her. >> to be honest, oprah, we sued so many people, i'm sure we did. >> you're suing people and you know that they're telling the truth. what is that? >> it's -- it's a major flaw, and it's a guy who expected to get whatever he wanted and to control every outcome. it's inexcusable. and that's -- when i say that there are people that will hear this and will never forgive
and certainly in the schools as well i think we can have a much safer community and environment for our kids than we have now. >> marc klaas joining us this morning. marc the father of polly klaas and the founder of the klaas kids foundation. thanks for talking to us. we appreciate your time this morning. >> thank you so much. >> many people pointed out that it appears in the video the little girl goes so easily with her mother, her mother wears a burqa and so maybe she didn't know it was her mother. kids that age will go with an adult. their whole lives are -- their lives -- >> right. >> i picked one of my friend's kids from tae kwon do, and they didn't ask where is mom and dad, where are we going, it's one of the things you have to be so careful that what kind of adults are around and i was amazed that an adult can stroll into a school and out with a child like this. >> children don't ask, okay, because their whole lives are built around, you go to that now, you do this now, i think it's really a terrifying thing that the people didn't say to you, i don't care if he says he knows you, i ne
a category you're interested in, everything from education to health. even the environment. and it will use geolocation to connect you with places to volunteer. and, of course, for those of you who are just counting down the minutes, there's an app for that too, of course. it's called the inauguration countdown. it's available on ios devices. the app will break down the days, hours, minutes, and yes, even seconds until the is ceremony. so on monday as president obama takes the oath, your front row seat at the digital ceremony may just be your smartphone. >> and laurie segal joins us right now. and laurie, since this is washington, no surprise, there is already a controversy over the inauguration app. tell us about this. >> you're absolutely right. people are worried they're putting their cell phone numbers in here and a report came out that said maybe this data could be used, and handed to third parties and you could end up on an e-mail list. i asked the question, they gave me a statement. let me read it quick. they say contrary to some concerns, the app only collects one sort of user data.
, not the rules you wish you had. so in this environment where republicans are spending hundreds of millions of dollars to try to defeat health care reform, you have to ask the question -- well, what are democrats going to do? who are progressives going to do to make sure our voices and values aren't droubed out because of the system we're in right now? >> you know what? we have to overturn citizens united. we need a constitutional amendment to do that and we need public financing of campaigns but i agree with bill. until we get there and the public has to push to get us there, we have to defeat some of the very -- this agenda that is really destroying the country and also, our democracy. it's making the voices of ordinary people, what is happening now, this undisclosed corporate money in politics is shrinking the democratic process and allowing corporations to dominate the political agenda and the voices of the american people are being diminished. >> so what are we going to do bt it? you've been very outspoken open this. you saw a ton of outside money too come into your race. i feel like w
the japanese planes will be flying again. it is an extremely confusing environment if you have one set of airlines saying they are grounding and another set of airlines saying they are still flying them. >> how disruptive is this for travelers? >> by and large, almost nonexistent. the airlines will swap in some -- jal and ana have canceled some flights, swapped in other aircraft, absolutely minimal. not at the moment an issue of disruption. >> richard quest, thank you. >>> so three months all alone at sea. coming up, we catch up with one of the most determined competitors we have ever met racing around the world all by himself. in a sailboat. ♪ using cloud computing and mobile technology, verizon innovators have developed a projective display for firefighters. allowing them to see through anything. because the world's biggest challenges deserve even bigger solutions. powerful answers. verizon. ya. alright, another one just like that. right in the old bucket. good toss! see that's much better! that was good. you had your shoulder pointed, you kept your eyes on your target. let's do it
proportionally because it was a real working-class environment which i grew up. so you didn't have mounds of food on your plate. and there were no snacks in our house. we didn't have potato chips or cookies. my mother would bake cookies once a week and then you'd have them as a treat. it was a whole different eating plan even though we were knocking back cokes all day long. >> with all due respect, i've heard this from joe, that's great that you ran all day. wonderful. that about the kids over the past 10, 20, 30 years who drank five cokes a day and didn't do that. >> is that coke's fault? that's the question. >> actually, it's part of a bigger problem just like the gun debate, okay? >> look, i have friends at coca-cola and friends at most of the soft drink companies. i think you've got to give them credit for at least putting this out there and saying obesity is an issue in america, and calories do count, and we're now talking about it as a result of them doing that. and it probably will generate some kind of a dialogue. >> i'll give them credit skeptically because i think they're covering thems
Search Results 0 to 33 of about 34 (some duplicates have been removed)